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The Nitty Gritty of Etiquette
 

By: David Rader II on June 12, 2008 @ 1:19 AM

You and I both are well aware that there's a certain way we must act to be perceived by others as courteous. Etiquette is the name and manners is the game. I'm going to share my observations into the depth of etiquette and ways I've found most useful adapting to them.

Many people know that etiquette varies from country to country, from culture to culture, and even subculture to subculture. From my observations and likely that of many others, I've realized that it goes even further to a smaller scale. Friends, families, and individuals each have unique sets of manners.

So in a world or even a house, how does anyone adapt to all of these different sets of manners? It seems the fundamental act of etiquette is to be accepting of others etiquette, however sometimes religions and cultures are often times doomed to push others away because of the high esteem they have for their own etiquette, or because their religious texts themselves state to discredit the mannerisms of others, thus making it very difficult for them to show their acts of kindness. This is very unfortunate, because whether they admit it or not, we're all a part of one major culture.

There is still hope though. So long as the fundamental act of etiquette, accepting of others mannerisms is done, then even if we have manners very different from theirs and even if they would be rude to us if we showed our very different etiquette, we can rely on the fundamentals, relying on humility, silence, listening, and reproduction of their etiquette. Usually people like things that are like themselves, the more people you realize are like you, the more people you will like.

I've shared the fundamental method of etiquette, being accepting of others - And the fundamental reason etiquette exists in the first place is to show others that we are the same. When we see others who have the same etiquette as us, such as shaking a hand when meeting, bowing, or the seemingly universal smile, then we feel more at ease. That does not mean those are the only ways of the other person to show that they want peace or friendship though.

One last observation of etiquette that I'm sharing for now is the sharing of etiquette. Sometimes teaching each other etiquette can actually be a fun activity, but even when it's not so fun, so long as someone else is observant, they'll see your etiquette and likely figure out what its for if they don't already know, but at the very least, seeing it before will make them more comfortable when someone else does it who they would otherwise see them as a completely unfamiliar person.

I hope my observations of the fundamentals of etiquette, accepting of others etiquett and its reason which alerts us that we're all similar will be helpful to you sometime. Don't forget to share etiquette you value with someone else when you get the chance. Don't be alarmed if someone seems to have no etiquette, because even dogs have etiquette, except they observers call their etiquette "social dynamics." Etiquette not only makes us comfortable, but is sign language, conversation itself, with always a chance of sharing the idea with others that we are equal with them.


Tags: etiquette 


Comments:
#1 The Grey Yogi June 15, 2008 @ 6:41 PM
Namaste...

Living and traveling through many diverse countries has taught me exactly what you are expressing...
Wisdom which is very useful in maintaining peace among diverse cultures...
Peace be with you...
Michael







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